Category Archives: Looking

Guide in KHTK

Affinity

In KHTK, a guide is one who helps another apply KHTK exercises. He may be a partner or a friend who is also interested in doing KHTK exercises. The two may do the exercises together encouraging and guiding each other.

All that is required of a guide is

  • Apply mindfulness at all times
  • Be familiar with KHTK exercises
  • Have compassion for all

The first thing that a guide helps another with is the application of mindfulness. He encourages the other person to think for himself, or herself, and practice mindfulness exercises per The 12 Aspects of Mindfulness

.

The guide recommends the correct KHTK exercise for the other person to work on, giving his reason. He provides factual information with no inconsistencies.

The person needn’t give to the guide any personal details of what he looked at during the exercise. The guide does not analyze a person’s data and give advice.

If the guide is told something he makes sure that he understands it. He responds only in terms of sorting out difficulties with the application of the 12 aspects of mindfulness.

The guide encourages the person to come up with creative ways to look at the area of interest more closely.

If the person’s attention is fixed or dispersed, the guide helps restore it to optimum with proper KHTK exercises.

Almost all exercises in KHTK may be applied by oneself. The guide simply encourages and aids as needed.

The guide does not challenge what the other person is doing. He simply helps the person understand the exercise.

The guide also aids in the development of the subject of KHTK based on his, or her, actual experience.

The guide offers his services as possible for him, and without fee. The compensation, if any, for the services may only be determined by the person helped.

KHTK Research Data

truthavail

 

The Absolute Truth is that there is nothing absolute in the world, that everything is relative, conditioned and impermanent, and that there is no unchanging, everlasting, absolute substance like Self, Soul, or Ātman within or without. ~ Buddha

.

THE FUNDAMENTALS

KHTK 06: KHTK Postulates for Metaphysics – Part 1

KHTK 07: KHTK Postulates for Metaphysics – Part 2

KHTK 08: KHTK Postulates for Metaphysics – Part 3

KHTK 09: KHTK Postulates for Metaphysics – Part 4

.

KHTK AXIOMS

RESEARCH 00: KHTK AXIOM #0: The Absolute

RESEARCH 01: KHTK AXIOM #1: The Relative

RESEARCH 02: KHTK AXIOM #2: Awareness

RESEARCH 03: KHTK AXIOM #3: Space-time

RESEARCH 04: KHTK AXIOM #4: Objects

RESEARCH 05: KHTK AXIOM #5: Existence

RESEARCH 06: KHTK AXIOM #6: The Universe

RESEARCH 07: KHTK AXIOM #7: Location

 

RESEARCH 08: KHTK Postulates

.

CONTEMPLATION

KHTK 31: The Fundamental Dimension

KHTK 32: The Sixth Sense

KHTK 33: KHTK Model of The Universe

KHTK 34: PERCEPTION & KNOWLEDGE

KHTK 35: KNOWLEDGE & INCONSISTENCY

KHTK 36: INCONSISTENCY & LOOKING

. 

KHTK AXIOMS (Earlier)

KHTK 51: KHTK AXIOM ZERO

KHTK 52: KHTK AXIOM ONE

KHTK 53: KHTK AXIOM TWO

KHTK 54: KHTK AXIOM THREE

KHTK 55: KHTK AXIOM FOUR

KHTK 56: KHTK AXIOM FIVE

KHTK 57: KHTK AXIOM SIX

KHTK 58: KHTK AXIOM SEVEN

KHTK 59: KHTK AXIOMS: A Work in Progress

KHTK 60: KHTK AXIOMS: A Work in Progress #2

.

OLD KHTK ESSAYS:

KHTK 14: Mind in Mindfulness

KHTK 300: The Basics of Meditation

KHTK 302: COMMENTS ON LOOKING

KHTK 303: THE BASICS OF LOOKING

KHTK 305: THE MECHANICS OF LOOKING

KHTK 306: THE PRACTICE OF LOOKING

KHTK 307: MEMORY & RECALL

KHTK 308: THE BASIC INCONSISTENCY

KHTK 309: GENERAL INCONSISTENCIES

KHTK 312: EXPERIENCING

KHTK 313: PERCEPTION

KHTK 314: THINKING & THOUGHT

KHTK 315: INCONSISTENCY

KHTK 316: ATTENTION

KHTK 317: UN-STACKING

KHTK 318: SUMMARY

KHTK 319: KHTK LOOKING: AN OVERVIEW

KHTK 324: Observation, Experience and Looking

KHTK 325: From Mystery to Knowing

KHTK 326: Inconsistencies and Knowledge

KHTK 327: FROM UNCONSCIOUSNESS TO KNOWING

KHTK 328: Looking and Illness

KHTK 329: Successes from KHTK

.

 KHTK 90: KHTK EXERCISES BASED ON BUDDHISM

.

OLD KHTK EXERCISES:

KHTK 200: KHTK EXERCISE SET 1 (old)

KHTK 201: KHTK EXERCISE SET 2 (old)

KHTK 204: KHTK EXERCISE SET I

KHTK 205: KHTK EXERCISE SET II

.

FOR REFERENCE ONLY

.

EARLY KHTK SERIES IN ENGLISH:

Early KHTK Exercises

.

KHTK 4A: VIEWPOINT: INTRODUCTION

KHTK 4B: VIEWPOINT: THE FILTER

KHTK 4C: VIEWPOINT: THE GUIDE

KHTK 4D: VIEWPOINT: SUMMARY

.

KHTK 5A: STILL BODY

KHTK 5B: POSTURES OF THE BODY

KHTK 5C: MOVEMENTS OF THE BODY

KHTK 5D: THE BODY: SUMMARY

.

EARLY KHTK SERIES IN SPANISH:

INTRODUCCION A KHTK

KHTK 1A: INTRODUCCION A MIRAR

KHTK 1B: MIRANDO y PENSANDO

KHTK 1C: MIRANDO LA MENTE

KHTK 1D: MIRANDO: PRÁCTICA

KHTK 1E : MIRANDO : RESUMEN

KHTK 1F: MIRANDO: COMENTARIOS

.

KHTK 2A: EXPERIMENTANDO

KHTK 2B: EXPERIMENTANDO (SINTIENDO): LA MENTE

KHTK 2C: EXPERIMENTANDO (SINTIENDO): PRÁCTICA

KHTK 2D: EXPERIMENTANDO (SINTIENDO): EJERCICIOS AVANZADOS

KHTK 2E: EXPERIMENTANDO (SINTIENDO): RESUMEN

.

KHTK 3A: ATENCIÓN: INTRODUCCIÓN

KHTK 3B: ATENCIÓN: EL AMBIENTE FÍSICO

KHTK 3C: ATENCIÓN: EL COMPONENTE FALTANTE

KHTK 3D: ATENCIÓN: LA MENTE

KHTK 3E: ATENCIÓN: RESUMEN

.

KHTK 4A : PUNTO DE VISTA : INTRODUCCIÓN

KHTK 4B: PUNTO DE VISTA: EL FILTRO

KHTK 4C: PUNTO DE VISTA: EL GUÍA

KHTK 4D: PUNTO DE VISTA: RESUMEN

.

KHTK 5A : CUERPO INMÓVIL

KHTK 5B : POSTURAS DEL CUERPO

KHTK 5C : MOVIMIENTOS DEL CUERPO

KHTK 5D : RESUMEN

KHTK 5: ATENCIÓN

.

EARLY KHTK SERIES IN ITALIAN:

KHTK 1A: OSSERVARE: INTRODUZIONE

KHTK 1B: OSSERVARE CONTRO PENSARE

KHTK 1C: OSSERVARE: LA MENTE

KHTK 1D: OSSERVARE: PRATICA/ESERCIZIO

KHTK 1E: OSSERVARE: RIASSUNTO

.

KHTK 2A: SPERIMENTARE: INTRODUZIONE

KHTK 2B: SPERIMENTARE: LA MENTE

.

KHTK 2C: EXPERIENCING: PRACTICE

August 19, 2014
This issue is now obsolete. For latest references please see: KHTK Mindfulness. The specific reference that updates this issue is The 12 Aspects of Mindfulness.
This was part of a basic series of essays, which started this blog. These essays were later revised and the original versions were deleted. However, these essays were then added back to maintain a complete record.
The basic idea introduced in this essay is being there with mindfulness.

.

Here is a general purpose exercise. In this exercise the guide may occasionally check, as necessary, to make sure you are looking and experiencing without thinking and resisting. The guide must take care not to interrupt when you are deeply absorbed in the exercise.

Exercise 2-7

1.    Find a place where you can sit comfortably and be there for a while without being disturbed or distracted.

2.    Simply observe with your eyes open. If you find your mind adding more to what is plainly visible, simply notice that fact and continue.

3.    Once you can comfortably notice what is there, and can differentiate it from what your mind tends to add to it, you may close your eyes.

4.    If you just see blackness, then observe that blackness. If you see a play of light and darkness, then observe that play of light and darkness.

5.    Observe the various sound and smells as they offer themselves to you. Do not strain to perceive them.

6.    Observe what your senses present to you, such as, the temperature in the room, the pull of gravity, or the taste in your mouth. Do not look for anything in particular. Just be there comfortably experiencing what is there.

7.    The mind may present “pictures” of the current and past events, some flattering and some not so flattering. Simply experience them without thinking. The scene may shift around continually.

8.    The mind may present emotions, such as, embarrassment, guilt, anxiety, anger, fear, grief, and even apathy. Simply experience whatever comes up without trying to judge it, or justify it.

9.    The mind may present various sensations, twitches in muscles, pain, effort to do, or not do something, etc. Do not avoid, resist or suppress these back. Just experience them fully. They will all clear out eventually.

10. There may be tendency to squirm, move or change position. If the discomfort lasts, readjust your body to a more comfortable position, while keeping your attention on experiencing the effort.

11. If you find yourself getting involved in thoughts, or mentally doing something else, then simply recognize this fact, and continue. Do not suppress anything. Do not add anything.

12. Let these feelings, emotions and sensations play themselves out. Do not speculate on reasons and possibilities. As you persevere, the uncomfortable feelings and sensations will clear out.

13. Try ending this exercise at a point when some persistent emotion or effort has just left, though this may not always be possible.

.

KHTK 3D: ATTENTION: THE MIND

August 25, 2014
This issue is now obsolete. For latest references please see: KHTK Mindfulness. The specific reference that updates this issue is Inconsistency in KHTK.
This was part of a basic series of essays, which started this blog. These essays were later revised and the original versions were deleted. However, these essays were then added back to maintain a complete record.
The basic idea introduced in this essay was that of INCONSISTENCY in the form of dispersal or fixation of attention.

.

When one is consistently running into problems in certain areas of life, such as, with relationships, or with finances, then there is definitely something in that area which is making one’s attention non-optimum. Other areas of non-optimum attention could be school subjects, such as, mathematics, that one simply cannot focus on.

It requires all available attention to carefully follow the trail of non-optimum attention inside the mind. Therefore, it is important to have one’s attention optimum with respect to the physical environment before taking a deep look at the mind.

If you find that it is getting uncomfortable to look at the mind, then step back and look at the physical environment until the attention is optimum. Then you may go back to looking at the mind.

Exercise 3-8

LOOK AROUND IN YOUR MIND AND

  1. Notice an area to which your attention repeatedly gets drawn toward.

  2. Notice an area from which your attention repeatedly gets pushed away from.

Just look and notice those areas. DON’T DO ANYTHING ELSE.

To resolve non-optimum attention fully one needs to look at the factors stacked up in the mind. These factors are interwoven with other factors in a complex manner. Mind is like a spring, or a bunch of springs, that are coiled up together very tightly. Complexities of the mind cannot be resolved through thinking alone.

However, it is possible to un-stack the mind by letting it do so. Mind is like a coiled spring. It uncoils itself when it is not interfered with. This principle is violated when one makes assumptions and pushes the mind to resolve problems with attention. A much safer approach is to:

Allow the mind to un-stack itself. It is like letting a coiled spring to uncoil itself.

All one has to do is to not force the mind, but simply look at what is there at the points of non-optimum attention. When left to itself, the mind does a wonderful job of un-stacking itself; and as part of this process the mind brings up data that needs to be looked at.

Simply look at the area of non-optimum attention without thinking, and experience whatever is there without resisting.

As one looks, questions may arise in areas where knowledge may be lacking. One may speed up the resolution of confusions in those areas by consulting reference materials. The best way to consult reference materials is again a top down approach.

One starts broadly by looking up the terminology which defines the subject one is interested in. One then proceeds to look up the key terminology as one narrows down to the specifics in that subject. Here one is looking at what others have observed. One cannot experience those observations the same way that the other person experienced them; but one can use those observations to sort out one’s own experience more fully.

Ultimately, what truly matters is one’s own experience. Observations by others are useful only to the degree that they help sort out one’s experiences.

To do the next exercise, find a place where you will be undisturbed for at least thirty minutes to an hour. Make sure you have had enough rest, and that you are not tired or hungry.

Exercise 3-9

1.    Close your eyes. Find an area of non-optimum attention that interests you the most. Start looking at that area without thinking.

2.    Allow the mind to un-stack itself by simply looking at what is there at any moment. Notice non-judgmentally whatever shows up.

3.    The scene may shift and the feelings may deepen. Dive into any feelings that may arise, and experience them fully.

4.    Simply continue without resisting. Do not try to figure out anything.

5.    Sooner or later the scenes may start to fade, and the feelings may start to lighten up.

6.    Sometimes, both the scene and the feeling may suddenly disappear, with realizations and better understanding of the area.

7.    End off the exercise when the attention is freed up on that area.

You may do the above exercise as often as you wish, each time picking up areas of non-optimum attention to observe. You may safely end the exercise when you find your attention is optimum, i.e., relatively free of fixations and dispersals.

.

KHTK 4D: VIEWPOINT: SUMMARY

August 27, 2014
This issue is now obsolete. For latest references please see: KHTK Mindfulness. The specific reference that updates this issue is Filter in KHTK.
This was part of a basic series of essays, which started this blog. These essays were later revised and the original versions were deleted. However, these essays were then added back to maintain a complete record.
The basic idea introduced in this essay was that of a Guide who assists with the application of KHTK.

.

We look at the world through multiple, interspersed layers of thinking, education, experience and consideration. Unbeknownst to us, these layers influence and even determine the perception of the world around us.

Hidden influences, however, lose their power as they are brought into awareness. The exercises outlined in this essay help you uncover those hidden influences. You may repeat these exercises as many times as you wish until this deep looking becomes a part of your second nature.

The whole idea in this essay is to practice the following:

BECOME AWARE OF “WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING THROUGH.”

As you discover the contents of what you are looking through, you come face to face with your basic considerations that have been controlling your view. You discover that you now have a choice to continue holding on to these considerations, or to detach yourself from them.

With this power of choice comes an exhilarating sense of freedom as well as a sense of great responsibility. The thinking becomes very clear. The complexities of life seem to reduce to utter simplicities.

You find that you can now immerse yourself in the joy of creating.

 

.