The Sixth Sense

sixth sense

The domain of the sixth sense is non-physical. It lies in the dimension of abstraction. The sense organ that specializes in the sixth sense is the mind.

Yes… the mind is essentially a sense organ. It senses mental objects. The other five sense organs – eye, ear, nose, tongue, body – sense physical objects. The physical senses operate primarily at the level of physicality. The mental sense operates throughout the dimension of abstraction.

The sixth sense of mind underlies these five senses. It not only extends these five senses, as in imagination, but it also perceives purely abstract patterns and associations, as in mathematics and logic. Deeper in the dimension of abstraction we may find spirituality and the source of intuition that flowers into arts and sciences.

Abstraction is a dimension in its own right. It may be called ‘the fifth dimension.’ It adds to the three dimensions of space and the fourth dimension of time. The upper limit of abstraction is physicality, which we perceive directly with eye, ear, nose, tongue, body. The lower limit of abstraction extends deep into spirituality, much of which is still unexplored.

Reality consists of what one perceives through the five physical senses. Reality is extended as one perceives the underlying patterns and associations.

Reality is the perception of physicality and of the abstraction beyond.

Sanity consists of seeing things as they are and not as they seem to be. Sanity is extended through an inherent sense of consistency found among objects and underlying patterns.

Sanity is seeing things as they are using an inherent sense of consistency.

This inherent sense of consistency is a major element of the sixth sense. Any time the direct perception and the inherent sense of consistency is violated, a bit of unreality and insanity creeps in.

Thus, reality and sanity arise from direct physical perception, and an inherent sense of consistency as one proceeds into abstraction. This is the level of science, mathematics and logic. The physical reality acts as the anchor to sanity.

The above gives us a clue to unreality and insanity. The worst of insanity is a psychotic break. This condition precipitates when the anchor of physical reality breaks away.  The person is completely lost. Verbal communications no longer work. The possible remedy comes from somehow restoring contact with physical reality.

For a person suffering from psychosis, any exercise that systematically restores contact with physical objects through direct perception, is a powerful remedy.

I have documented such exercises at Mindfulness Therapy. Even a normal person may benefit from doing exercises that increase one’s contact with physicality.

In the normal course of activity, the best way to develop this sixth sense is seeing things as they are. It starts with physical objects but then extends into seeing mental objects as well, deep into the dimension of abstraction. The procedure for developing sixth sense is called mindfulness.

I hope that you enjoy developing and using your sixth sense.

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[For further details, please see: KHTK Mindfulness]

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Comments

  • vinaire  On July 17, 2013 at 6:03 AM

    This technique of using gradient scales is very powerful. It allows one to perceive what is really there. Thus, one may discover the underpinnings of the unwanted condition by direct perception and not by any analysis. Thus, the “reality” of an unwanted condition may be deconstructed.

    By the same token, this technique could be used to make a person believe in a desired reality by molding his existing ideas, biases, fixations, etc., in gradient steps. Here the idea of gradually establishing agreements comes in.

    An agreement would be something that is accepted without examination. No agreement is necessary where natural consistency or harmony exists.

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  • vinaire  On July 17, 2013 at 6:05 AM

    Hubbard coded spirituality as THETA and assigned it the characteristic of individuality. He coded physicality as MEST and assigned it the characteristic of automaticity. To him THETA and MEST were two vectors diametrically opposed to each other.

    To Buddha, spirituality and physicality were two aspects of the same universe. Their natural condition was to be in harmony with each other. But Hubbard could never conceive of THETA and MEST as being in harmony. To him, THETA becoming one with MEST meant the loss of individuality. For him, there was no nirvana.

    Hubbard’s goal was to attain the ultimate in individuality, which was the state of thetan. Thetan was neither the body nor the mind. Body and mind were aspects of MEST. Thetan asserted its individuality by completely controlling the body and the mind.

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  • vinaire  On July 17, 2013 at 6:06 AM

    To Hubbard, THETA created MEST, which, in its turn, had a corrupting influence on THETA. THETA was the only reality and MEST was illusion. THETA must fight the illusion of MEST to preserve its individuality at all cost.

    Buddha had no such preference for spirituality over physicality. To him both were aspects of existence. This existence is relative and always in a flux. Nothing is absolute and permanent. If one is mindful, no agreement is needed.

    Perception is simply there, and so is sensation. Answer to ‘why?’ and ‘how?’ will come as one patiently recognizes what is there without assumptions.

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    • Chris Thompson  On July 17, 2013 at 8:44 PM

      Vin: Perception is simply there, and so is sensation. Answer to ‘why?’ and ‘how?’ will come as one patiently recognizes what is there without assumptions.

      Chris: I’ve backtracked in my own path to the point where I went down Hubbard’s and begun again and pleased with the road that lays ahead. Today I was looking again at the sense of dichotomy which is pivotal to Hubbard’s reality and once again saw that perceive and percept is together.

      • vinaire  On September 1, 2013 at 7:16 AM

        I believe that one is mature after having gone down the path of Hubbard and then back. Something has been viewed and gotten out of the system.

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  • vinaire  On July 17, 2013 at 6:08 AM

    A rational viewpoint looks at both THETA and MEST as aspects of the universe. By taking the side of THETA against MEST Hubbard narrowed his viewpoint and introduced irrationality.

    Anything perceived directly does not have to be proved. Solidity and sensations are simply there. There is no need for assigning and proving ownership. Cause and effect are associations that may be perceived directly. These don’t have to be proved.

    Reality is what one perceives directly. It is not delusion. Delusion is assuming things and assigning relationships that are not there. As one practices mindfulness delusion starts to disappear. Responsibility lies in being mindful. It is seeing things as they are.

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  • vinaire  On July 17, 2013 at 7:39 AM

    Essentially there is awareness that comes from perception. The idea of “who is aware” assumes that there must be a “who” that is aware. From this comes the idea of “I”, “you”, “he”, “self”, “others”, etc. Then the idea of “who things belong to” assumes relationships that are not there. By definition, such assumptions are delusions. However, they are deeply ingrained in the psyche.

    Mindfulness recognizes these assumptions for what they are.

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    • Chris Thompson  On July 17, 2013 at 9:08 PM

      Vin: Essentially there is awareness that comes from perception.

      Chris: I am even thinking we can drop that.

      • vinaire  On September 1, 2013 at 7:19 AM

        Actually, perception is the next stage after awareness. The previous stage seems to be interaction.

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        • Chris Thompson  On September 1, 2013 at 2:37 PM

          To be consistent we need to acknowledge that there is no awareness before perception. We’ve already established that.

  • vinaire  On July 17, 2013 at 8:01 AM

    Essentially there is awareness that comes from perception. The idea of “who is aware” assumes that there must be a “who” that is aware. From this comes the idea of “I”, “you”, “he”, “self”, “others”, etc. Then the idea of “who things belong to” assumes relationships that are not there. By definition, such assumptions are delusions. However, they are deeply ingrained in the psyche.

    Mindfulness recognizes these assumptions for what they are. Creative Processing works because it restores mindfulness. It makes one see what is there, and what is not there but assumed.

    However, Hubbard stops short of recognizing “who” and “ownership” as assumptions, and considers them to be absolute. The THETA-MEST theory then expresses this delusion, and Creative Processing is then used to build this delusion as “reality.”

    This is Scientology.

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    • Chris Thompson  On July 17, 2013 at 9:14 PM

      Vin: The THETA-MEST theory then expresses this delusion, and Creative Processing is then used to build this delusion as “reality.”

      Chris: I don’t quite agree with this demarcation of delusion vs abstraction. What I see are many running mental processes. When one’s abstraction is more consistent with the motion of the world, more useful in terms of operating smoothly and successfully in the world, we say the person is clear-minded, smart, brilliant, etc.,. When one’s abstraction are less consistent with said world, more tangled and less able to compute accurately, then we call that person slow, retarded, crazy and delusional, etc.,. We can apply our gradient scales to this topic of delusion as well as other topics.

      • vinaire  On September 8, 2013 at 3:42 PM

        One can be very consistent within a bubble, yet the whole bubble can be delusional.

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        • Chris Thompson  On September 9, 2013 at 9:07 AM

          An example: The Mandelbrot set consists of those coordinates which fall within that consistent, orderly, and cogent pattern or grouping that we call a set. There are other coordinates derived from the fractal formulae which veer off and tend away from their recognizable sets. Those coordinates are real and not illusory yet do not fall within the recognizable pattern. This difference is how I view these differences that we discuss of abstraction, illusion, delusion, and hallucination. I see them as describable mathematically and conversely I see consciousness also as describable mathematically. Can I do it yet? No. However, that I do not know enough of the mathematical language to describe for others the patterns that I see, does not mean that I do not see them nor that I do not see their general correlations to existence. I think you recognize this about me by now. Because this is true of me, I assume that others, possibly many others experience the epiphanies that I experience and may be equally unable to write about them.

        • Chris Thompson  On September 9, 2013 at 9:16 AM

          Vin: One can be very consistent within a bubble, yet the whole bubble can be delusional.

          Chris: Yes. This is what working with the maths and geometry has helped me see.

  • vinaire  On July 18, 2013 at 5:41 AM

    It is desire that underlies the assumptions of “who” and “possession”. It prevents one from perceiving what is there. It is the desire that makes one assume. The assumptions are what traps one.

    The desire is the pressure; assumptions are the quickie method of handling that pressure. That pressure when redirected through Creative Processing into seeing things as they are, frees one up from constraints. In fact, Creative Processing seem to resolve the desire itself.

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  • vinaire  On July 18, 2013 at 7:25 AM

    The imagination, or mocking up, of a difficulty on a gradient involves,

    (1) Mocking up an aspect of that condition. Cut it back if it is too much to handle.

    (2) Move it around in space and time until all viewpoints have been examined.

    (3) Vary it in shape, color, distance, orientation, etc. until all viewpoints have been examined.

    (4) Continuously observe what appears inconsistent or consistent without assuming.

    (5) When an aspect is mocked up and examined successfully, move to mocking up another aspect.

    (6) Do this until the whole difficulty is sorted out and appears to have no inconsistency.

    (7) Review the whole difficulty, or the unwanted condition, for understanding.

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