The General Principle of Objectivity

Objectivity

Reference: Disturbance Theory

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In Relativity & Problem of Space Einstein expresses the general principle of relativity as follows:

General principle of relativity: Natural laws must be covariant with respect to arbitrary continuous transformations of the co-ordinates.

The coordinates refer to space-time in which all phenomena take place. According to this principle natural laws and continuous transformations of phenomena must go hand-in-hand. In other words,

All natural relationships in the universe must be consistent with each other.

However, Einstein limits his principle to the physical phenomena only because he holds the physical universe to be objective. To him any perception and understanding of the physical universe is subjective.

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Observer versus Observed

From The Postulates,

Postulate #2: The UNIVERSE is a single system that is intrinsically continuous, harmonious and consistent.

The universe is what it is. Its perceptions are what they are. The observer and observed are part of the same system. Therefore, the above postulate leads to the following,

General principle of objectivity: The essential criterion of objectivity is continuity, harmony and consistency among all observations.

This general principle of objectivity applies to the whole system, which includes both the observer and the observed. Hence its criterion applies equally also to perceptions and the understanding of phenomenon.

On the other hand Einstein’s general principle of relativity excludes perceptions and understanding from its criterion of objectivity. To that degree it is incomplete.

The general principle of relativity is incomplete as it excludes perceptions and understanding from its criterion of objectivity.

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“Real External World”

In Einstein’s view, the objectivity of space has already been established by the success of Newtonian mechanics; and the objectivity of time is established only when more than one person experiences the event taking place. The agreement among the persons establishes that the event exists in the “real external world”. So, for Einstein, only “the external world” is objective and not the “internal world” of a person.

But the universe is an integrated whole. It doesn’t exclude anything. So, the following labels are arbitrary and unnecessary: Label 1: “space is physical and, therefore, objective”. Label 2: “time is mental and, therefore, subjective”.

“Physical” and “mental” are attributes of the universe. They are not separate and independent  of each other. They cannot be treated differently.

“External world” and “internal world”, are arbitrary labels, that falsify the integrity of the universe.

Einstein holds a black and white view of objectivity and subjectivity. The general principle of objectivity presents a more logical view.

General principle of objectivity: The essential criterion of objectivity is continuity, harmony and consistency among all observations.

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Objectivity versus Subjectivity

According to the general principle of objectivity, “objectivity” and “subjectivity” form the two ends of a continuous scale, like hot and cold form the two ends of a temperature scale. There are degrees of objectivity and subjectivity of observation, just like there are degrees of hotness and coldness of temperature.

Einstein believed in the consistency of observations to be the criterion of objectivity. The universe is inherently continuous, harmonious and consistent in all its aspects. Thus, consistency is inherent in the universe, and, therefore, the universe is naturally objective.

Subjectivity is the degree to which one fails to observe the continuity, harmony and consistency of the universe.

Thus, when there is subjectivity, there is something missing from observation. This alerts one to look for the missing datum.

The general principle of objectivity also establishes the criterion for philosophy, logic, mathematics and science.

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Further Research

We shall now apply the criterion from the general principle of objectivity to look at the problem of space more closely.

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