The Mind’s Resolution

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A mind is troubled when it is beset with doubts, perplexities and problems. Such troubles come from misalignment of data in the mind, which prevents the mind from resolving the troubles.  If that data could be aligned the troubles shall resolve.

The mind tries to resolve the misalignment of data by making postulates. A postulate is something taken as self-evident or assumed without proof as a basis for reasoning. A postulate is valid to the degree it helps align data. A valid postulate makes it possible to resolves doubts, perplexities and problems.

A postulate is something taken as self-evident or assumed without proof as a basis for reasoning. 

The common error occurs when the postulates align data only within a narrow context. Thus difficulties and problems are partially resolved in a narrow context only. From this comes about the idea of comfort zones. The narrow-minded postulates do not work beyond their comfort zones.

People become used to their narrow-minded postulates. These postulates become part of their mindset and beingness. They are happy as long as they are in their comfort zone. But when their circumstances change they find it difficult to adjust and they become unhappy. Most people are unhappy because nothing remains the same in this universe for long. It is common to be thrown out of comfort zone.

The mind becomes problematic when its postulates align data only within a narrow context.

In other words, all problems come from being narrow-minded. The solution, therefore, is to have postulates that help one align data in as broad a context as possible. One’s postulate must be flexible. When one becomes aware of a larger context, one should be able to update the postulates to align data in that larger context.

The solution is to develop postulates that help one align data in as broad a context as possible.

The mind becomes more problematic as its narrow-minded postulates become fixed. Resistance to change comes from fixed narrow-minded postulates.  The only way to overcome this resistance is to encourage willingness to examine the misalignments of data in a larger context.

Resistance to change comes from narrow-minded postulates that have become fixed.

Postulates that help align data in a universal context are considered objective. The laws pf physics fall in this category and so do the fundamental postulates of various philosophies. Postulates that help align data in a limited context only are considered subjective.

Postulates that can help align data in a universal context are objective. They can help resolve all doubts, perplexities and problems

Subjective postulates are usually limited to the context of “self” of a person. These subjective postulates act like filters that “color” the perceptions and evaluations of the person. Any problems that extend beyond the “self” of the person cannot be resolved by subjective postulates.

A person unwilling to change his subjective postulates ends up generating unusual solutions to resolve his problems. His life becomes increasingly complex, and he mostly runs around on wild goose chases.

Subjective postulates make one’s life very complex.

Free association helps one align data in a universal context. It helps one upgrade the postulates from subjective to objective. Sometimes misalignments in data come about from traumatic painful experiences. To resolve such misalignments free association needs to be carried out in a patient and disciplined manner. That discipline is provided by mindfulness.

Severe misalignments of data may be resolved through practice of free association under the discipline of mindfulness.

In cases where deeply painful data is difficult to access, a mindfulness guide may help the person through needed free associations. The mind is then able to inspect the postulates made under traumatic conditions and sort them out.

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