Continuing the Research

I did the experimental research mentioned in The Future of Education while participating in an ongoing G.E.D. program at a Church in New Port Richie, Florida.

I started to lecture on mathematics after organizing the materials such that they followed the logical structure of the subject (see Primary School Review). A girl who had been struggling with math for months, and always looked morose, started to look happy and eager to learn after just four such lectures. There were many such promising results. There were many comments like, “If you were my teacher in school I wouldn’t have dropped out.”

I had to end this informal experimental research because those in-charge of the program had purchased a computer-based system for G.E.D. instruction. I tried but didn’t get formal permission to continue with my educational research. After I left the program I received this touching email from a student.

“Hello. 

 I was very upset when I walked into Class today to find out you will not be there Anymore. 

 I left Early, and I was filled with Sadness, For you have became an important part of my life. For the first time in my life, I was actually beginning to understand, and take math in, Because of you and the way you Teach. I am not the only one who is upset, and is going to miss you, But I understand. I will not Forget what you have taught me, Math and Spiritual, And I will use it as I continue my Journey. I just want to thank you for Everything. Your efforts did not go Unappreciated. Take Care, Your Little Conary :)”

Jokingly I had compared this student to a canary that was taken down in mines by miners in old times to warn them of inflammable gases. This student was simply lost where math was concerned and was the first one in the class whose expressions warned me that I should be more simple in my explanations.

I have given thought to how an SLC program could be organized. It would require Lesson Plans that follow the logical structure of a subject. The two most important subjects are Mathematics (to develop “systematic thinking”), and Language Art (to help one with “communication skills”). The fundamentals of these subject must be captured carefully in the beginning lesson plans. 

The lesson plans for Mathematics are completed, and they are available at Course on Mathematics. As the student becomes a self-learner, he simply needs good textbooks. In mathematics, I find that century old books in Arithmetic, Algebra and Geometry are much more helpful from the viewpoint of conceptual understanding. Such books are provided at the Remedial Math link.

Lesson plans for Language Arts and other subjects may be researched and developed when an SLC is established.

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