Category Archives: M-Book

Emptiness and Self

whirlpool_by_lord_rosse

Reference: Mindfulness Approach

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The Buddhist concept of “emptiness” is described at Emptiness.

EMPTINESS is the ultimate reference point from which all phenomena can be understood objectively without any pre-conceived notion.

The Buddhist concept of “self” is described at The Structure of “I”

There is no unmoving mover behind the movement. It is only movement.

It is not correct to say that life is moving, but life is movement itself. Life and movement are not two different things. In other words, there is no thinker behind the thought. Thought itself is the thinker.

If you move the thought, there is no thinker to be found.

Here we cannot fail to notice how this Buddhist view is diametrically opposed to the Cartesian cogito ergo sum: ‘I think, therefore I am.’ This is counter-intuitive, indeed.

So, in nirvana, self simply disappears into emptiness.

The self is simply a mock-up. It is however you mock it up. Underlying self is emptiness.

You stop mocking up the self, and you disappear too.

For most people that is terrible, indeed!

But the disappearance of “you” or “I” means the disappearance of the filters only.

What remains is the universal viewpoint with no preconceived notion.

Buddhism is the only system based on the OBJECTIVITY of “emptiness”, and not on the SUBJECTIVITY of “self”.

Buddha said, “The Absolute Truth is that there is nothing absolute in the world, that everything is relative, conditioned and impermanent, and that there is no unchanging, everlasting, absolute substance like Self, Soul, or Ātman within or without.”

All systems of religion and philosophy (other than Buddhism) are based on the SUBJECTIVITY of “self”.

The basic-basic that Hubbard (of Scientology) was looking for is the idea of soul, self or thetan that installs an arbitrary pre-conceived notion as the reference point in one’s thinking.

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The Unassimilated Perceptions

businessman being pulled by strings like a puppet

Reference: Mindfulness Approach

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Normally the perceptions are continually assimilated in the mental matrix as they are received. The assimilated matrix then creates thoughts, which generate emotional charge to trigger required physical responses in the body.

The mental matrix in humans is extremely sensitive. Therefore, traumatic shocks are walled off to prevent damage. The perceptions of such shock then exist at the core of a node that cannot be assimilated in the mental matrix. This unassimilated node is an experience, complete with thoughts, emotions, and efforts, occupying a precise place in space and a moment in time. The contents of this node remain hidden from the person. A person is only aware of the data assimilated in the mental matrix.

The computations arising from the unassimilated node are then forced on the person. The person does not understand such computations, so he is forced to justify them. All irrational thinking, and the resulting obsessions and compulsions are generated by these computations.

The purpose of this mindfulness exercise is to locate the unassimilated nodes and help unveil their contents (which primarily consists of shocks). When these contents are allowed to assimilate with the rest of mental matrix, their irrational computations resolve and the consequent aberrations disappear.

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EXERCISE: The Unassimilated Perceptions

PURPOSE: To locate the unassimilated node.

PREREQUISITE: In case of increasing discomfort return to the exercise Accessibility of Memory.

GUIDING PRINCIPLE: The Discipline of Mindfulness

STEPS:

  1. Focus your attention on the unwanted condition you want to resolve. Let the mind freely associate all data related to this condition without being directed.

  2. Let the unwanted condition narrow down to a specific situation that is persisting. Contemplate on this situation with the idea of locating the underlying computation.

  3. Let the underlying computation present itself. Contemplate until this computation narrows down to become very specific.

  4. Notice some obvious physical aberration, which is persisting because of that computation. Follow down the effort it will take to generate that aberration.

  5. Educate yourself in recalling efforts by making a present time effort and then recalling it.

  6. Focus on the effort required to generate the deficiency the person has. Contemplate on it until an incident from past comes up. This is the most critical step. It may take a long time.

  7. Contemplate on that incident in detail. Broaden your viewpoint as much as possible to look at every detail of this incident. Continue to do so until you recover the emotions encysted in that incident.

  8. Experience those emotions fully. Continue to experience them until all tension is discharged from those emotions. As you do so your tone may improve from apathy through grief, fear, anger, antagonism and boredom to cheerfulness.

  9. Focus on the postulates buried under those emotions. You need to recover these postulates to finally assimilate this “unassimilated node” into your mental matrix.

  10. Contemplate on these postulates to clean up all the anomalies associated with them. The ultimate relief comes when all anomalies are resolved.

  11. Continue with this exercise in, at least, 20 minutes long sessions until it is completed.

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Start, Stop and Change

Swing
Reference: Mindfulness Approach

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A child has a natural sense of justice. Being small, it is difficult for him to always defend it. He may answer the injustice done to him by wishing off the injury or illness upon another. This failing, he takes it himself. As he gets sympathy for his injury or illness, he starts to use that as a “protest” to the injustice done to him. Thus, when a person is cutting a sorry figure by being sick, he is actually protesting some wrong done to him.

The basic efforts are to be, and not to be. These resolve into the efforts to start, to stop, to change, not to start, not to stop and not to change. In this exercise the student simply looks at the memories of starting, stopping and changing (moving) things, or not, to implement his sense of order and justice.

The steps of this exercise are similar to those of Accessibility of MemoryThe student lets the memory come up naturally and does not force the mind. If no memory comes up then he moves to the next step.

The whole idea of this exercise is to jog into memory the past painful and/or emotional incidents so that the pain and emotion can be discharged properly.  To accomplish this, go over the incident from start to finish several times. Each time look at that incident more closely, until all the charge (tension) reduces.

NOTE: Keep in mind that the “incident”, which comes up could be a chain of similar incidents. In that case you must discharge the pain and emotion from the whole chain, by scanning it repeatedly.

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EXERCISE: Start, Stop and Change

PURPOSE: To look at the efforts to implement a sense of order and justice.

PREREQUISITE:  In case of increasing discomfort return to the exercise Accessibility of Memory.

GUIDING PRINCIPLE: The Discipline of Mindfulness

STEPS:

  1. Focus your attention on the first item from the following list. Contemplate upon it to see if it triggers a memory.

  2. If a memory comes up view the physical perceptions connected with that memory. If any emotion comes up experience it fully until it discharges. 

  3. See if there is another memory connected with that item. When there are several memories triggered by an item, start with the earliest memory present. View the physical perceptions and discharge any emotions completely.

  4. If no memory comes up, then either no memory is there, or the memory is not accessible at that moment. Focus your attention on the next item from the list.

  5. Do not interfere with the mind. Let it carry out its natural functions in the background.

  6. Do this exercise for at least 20 minutes. End it off at a good point.

  7. You may repeat this exercise as many times as necessary.

The List:

[Consider these items in the context of  your sense of order and justice. Complete the whole list.]

  1. When you tried to start something for yourself

  2. When you tried not to start something for yourself

  3. When you tried to stop something for yourself

  4. When you tried not to stop something for yourself

  5. When you tried to change something for yourself

  6. When you tried not to change something for yourself

  7. When you tried to start something for your family

  8. When you tried not to start something for your family

  9. When you tried to stop something for your family

  10. When you tried not to stop something for your family

  11. When you tried to change something for your family

  12. When you tried not to change something for your family

  13. When you tried to start something for the society

  14. When you tried not to start something for the society

  15. When you tried to stop something for the society

  16. When you tried not to stop something for the society

  17. When you tried to change something for the society

  18. When you tried not to change something for the society

  19. When you tried to start something for the mankind

  20. When you tried not to start something for the mankind

  21. When you tried to stop something for the mankind

  22. When you tried not to stop something for the mankind

  23. When you tried to change something for the mankind

  24. When you tried not to change something for the mankind

  25. When you tried to start something for all life

  26. When you tried not to start something for all life

  27. When you tried to stop something for all life

  28. When you tried not to stop something for all life

  29. When you tried to change something for all life

  30. When you tried not to change something for all life

  31. When you tried to start something for the physical existence

  32. When you tried not to start something for the physical existence

  33. When you tried to stop something for the physical existence

  34. When you tried not to stop something for the physical existence

  35. When you tried to change something for the physical existence

  36. When you tried not to change something for the physical existence

  37. When you tried to start something for the spiritual existence

  38. When you tried not to start something for the spiritual existence

  39. When you tried to stop something for the spiritual existence

  40. When you tried not to stop something for the spiritual existence

  41. When you tried to change something for the spiritual existence

  42. When you tried not to change something for the spiritual existence

  43. When you tried to start something for the entirety of the universe

  44. When you tried not to start something for the entirety of the universe

  45. When you tried to stop something for the entirety of the universe

  46. When you tried not to stop something for the entirety of the universe

  47. When you tried to change something for the entirety of the universe

  48. When you tried not to change something for the entirety of the universe

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The Mindfulness Guide

Mindfulness Guide

Reference: Mindfulness Approach

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The role of the mindfulness guide is to help reestablish the ability of a person to think for himself. This is done by resolving all unassimilated nodes in the person’s mental matrix. The mindfulness guide does not assert any control over the other person.

The mindfulness guide acts as follows when guiding another person.

ACT ONE: He must review his commitment to restore the other person’s ability to think for himself.

ACT TWO: He must establish himself simply as a guide in the mind of the other person, and not as some authority.

ACT THREE: His beginning actions are to clean up the anomalies currently absorbing the other person’s attention. He does that by listening to the other person and acknowledging his concerns. He then explains the discipline of mindfulness, and how it can handle the other person’s concerns.

ACT FOUR: His next action is to establish in the other person the understanding of the discipline of mindfulness through the exercises Mindfulness meditation and Discerning the Environment. He then helps the person unwind his mind through the exercise, Accessibility of Memory.

This approach shall help extrovert the person’s attention and help him think more clearly. This is especially vital for heavily introverted cases.

The mindfulness guide then helps the other person become a mindfulness practitioner by practicing subsequent exercises as laid out here.

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Accessibility of Memory

recall
Reference: Mindfulness Approach

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This exercise helps practice mindfulness with respect to memory. The student may feel that a memory may be there, but then he determines rapidly whether that memory is accessible or not.

In this exercise the student reads an item from a list to see if it triggers a memory or not. If a memory comes up, he acknowledges its presence and looks at all the physical perceptions it contains.

If no memory comes up, he understands that the memory is not accessible at that time. He does not force the mind, or interferes with it in any way, to bring the memory up. He trusts the natural processes of the mind to provide him with the memories.

The exercise gives the person some familiarity with the Discipline of Mindfulness.

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EXERCISE: Accessibility of Memory

PURPOSE: To recognize and respect the accessibility of memories.

PREREQUISITE:  Always go back to Discerning the Environment if you are having trouble doing this exercise.

GUIDING PRINCIPLE: The Discipline of Mindfulness

STEPS:

  1. Focus your attention randomly on an item from the following list. Contemplate it to see if it triggers a memory.

  2. If a memory comes up, acknowledge its presence and view the physical perceptions connected to that memory. Then see if there is another memory connected with that item.

  3. If no memory comes up, then acknowledge that memory is not accessible at that moment. Focus your attention on another item from the list.

  4. When there are several memories triggered by an item, then view them in the order naturally suggested by the mind.

  5. When a memory comes up that is too introverting or upsetting then go back to Discerning the Environment to extrovert the attention.

  6. Do not interfere with the mind. Let it carry out its functions in the most natural fashion.

  7. Do this exercise for at least 20 minutes. Then end it off at a good point.

The List:

  1. You were happy.
  2. You climbed a tree.
  3. You ate something good.
  4. You received a present.
  5. You enjoyed a laugh.
  6. You helped somebody.
  7. You threw a ball.
  8. Something important happened to you.
  9. You played a game.
  10. You jumped down from a tree.
  11. You won a contest.
  12. You laughed loudly.
  13. You met someone you liked.
  14. You flew on a plane.
  15. You were at a beautiful place.
  16. You jumped into a pool.
  17. You enjoyed a beautiful morning.
  18. You went for a walk.
  19. Somebody teased you.
  20. You sat in a coffee shop.
  21. You danced with joy.
  22. You raced with someone.
  23. You completed something important.
  24. You were pleasantly surprised.
  25. You met somebody after a long time.
  26. You were caught in a rain.
  27. You heard a thunder.
  28. Someone smiled at you.
  29. You played with a pet.
  30. You held someone’s hand.
  31. Someone picked you up.
  32. You were spinning around.
  33. You read a good book.
  34. You felt breeze on your face.
  35. You saw a beautiful flower.
  36. You smelled a rose.
  37. Somebody called you.
  38. You were in a play.
  39. You sang aloud.
  40. You watched a movie.
  41. Your team won.
  42. You rode with friends.
  43. You visited a beautiful garden.
  44. You played in water.
  45. The weather was stormy.
  46. Somebody gave you a hug.
  47. You liked somebody.
  48. You slid down a slide.
  49. You ran toward someone you liked.
  50. You enjoyed beautiful weather.

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NOTE:

In mindfulness, the basic tool is the discipline of mindfulness. Apart from that a person is basically interested in the physical and mental objects that form up in the mind.

Physical objects in the mind are copies of physical objects perceived from the environment. Mental objects in the mind are distinct thoughts, emotions and efforts that can be clearly identified.

Mental computations are allowed to occur as automatic free associations in the background. The person does not get involved with the computations.

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